Yes, but the knowledge taught now is particular rather than general. And so world history gets squeezed out for an extra helping of whatever a specialty needs. (And agreement about what exactly should make up a general education is also far harder to come by, even for places that try.)

Lack of transfer of knowledge is demonstrated again and again and is kind of amazingly resistant. Knowing how to do a thing in domain A only rarely carries over to doing it in domain B. Which is why “computery stuff will make people such whizzes at (math/physics/whathaveyou)” is wishful BS.

Though on teaching intelligence, there definitely was a big shift from Uni being a rare thing to being generally expected - and what happens when you aim to grant the whole bell curve a degree as a matter of course.

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variablepulserate.10centuries.org.

gerroffmahlahn

matigo.ca.

Yes. The sentiment crystallized into a slogan both too late and too early for something intended as a retort to the timeless “kids these days”.

matigo.ca.

More that the focus has narrowed to prepping individuals for specialized labor. Universities create psychologists and biologists and physicists and chemists, not educated gentlefolk.

Universities make their money off hoteling, parties, and sports. Or as “Whatever Happened to General Education?” puts it: Finance, football, and fraternities—not philosophy or physics—are the pillars of the modern American university. It’s been that way for more than a century… [chadwellmon.com]

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variablepulserate.10centuries.org.

Oh hey I have one of those. It has actual ports! I miss when Apple laptops were actually computers and not minimalistic screens with keyboards.

matigo.ca.

This just sounds like “how come young people know about (cause célèbre of the day) but not (horrific event of their great grandparents).” I think the shorthand for that of today is “ok boomer”. 🤪

(The other half of it is college and vocational school becoming less distinguishable over time - already becoming an issue in wake of World War I and explosion of scientific disciplines and loss of confidence in a single truth IIRC.)

matigo.ca.

That bit about humanity not changing and that being fascinating underlies my interest in Ancient Near East society. The idea of Akkadian schoolboys doing Sumerian grammar drills under a schoolmaster and then running off to play is just mindblowingly recognizable.

matigo.ca.

Yeah, I use GitHub as my identity provider for all the dev forums.

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variablepulserate.10centuries.org.

shorthand email forum would be an edit-o, sorry. All the shorthand forums I know are Web or Reddit or Walled Garden.

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variablepulserate.10centuries.org.

Yes, it’s in light of R that I’m surprised to see SPSS. R was already starting to displace it when I was in college in the mid-2000s. A decade and a half later, the R ecosystem has grown tremendously and produced some really powerful tools for visualizing, exploring, slicing, and dicing data. (I’m off to one side being glad it’s all there should I need it one day, while I transform data from poorly-understood format A to ill-defined format B for 99% of the time.)

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matigo.ca.